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04 Feb 23 156 0 0

Houston Chef Used Food to Invest in His Community

Cool Story - Houston Chef Used Food to Invest in His Community

Houston chef Chris Williams was determined to keep the lights on at Lucille's, his 10-year-old "well-refined Southern food" eatery in the Museum District—without furloughing a single employee. This was despite businesses around the nation reducing hours, terminating employees, or closing permanently in reaction to the pandemic.

In a pre-show video that appeared before Oprah's "The Life You Want Class" on service, he said, "Business was down 92 percent, but we made a pledge to retain 100 percent of our crew on since they are like family." "We wanted to figure out how we might use our resources and abilities to aid someone."

He knew that food is therapeutic, as Gayle remarked, so his initial thought was to feed the neighborhood emergency personnel. Food, according to him, "taps into something better that has happened to us previously." Food always brings back these amazing memories. People occasionally take it for granted, but it is a tremendous thing.

Williams acknowledged right on that charity "is kind of addictive." He expanded meal distribution to fragile and immunocompromised elderly residents as well as impoverished food desert regions including Sunnyside, Third Ward, and Acres Homes, where the majority of his father's family originates from.

Williams was starting to figure out in his head how we were going to live. He established a nonprofit organization called Lucille's 1913 to manage the feeding program and all of his other philanthropic activities, including organizing voter registration drives, renting out his patio to struggling bars without one so they could make some money to survive, and collaborating with an urban farm to offer low-cost local seasonal food and career training."

Williams had to be honest with his landlord and suppliers to be of service, keep his pledge to his staff, and guarantee that Lucille's would continue after Covid. 

We [can] keep doing business and I'll cover genuine costs, or you may keep trying to generate a profit. Then Williams followed his advice. I internalized it, and we also neglected profit, he continued. They invested any additional funds on food after paying their employees and paying their bills. They immediately returned it to the community.

The economics of compassion and volunteerism worked in his favor. The man added, "The lesson I keep learning is that every investment you make in your neighborhood will ultimately be rewarded by the community."

Williams could do even more since businesses like Talenti contributed to the pot. Talenti made a very kind $10,000 donation. They've effectively served as a megaphone for our platform to spread the news and get support from all over the country for what we're doing. People have put their trust in us to serve as their channel for their goodwill.

Williams is pleased with his team's charitable work and the meals they serve, but, if he's being completely honest, he finds the attention a little uncomfortable. We didn't intend to be loud, but now that we are, it implies that people are paying a lot of attention, he said. They were carrying it out because they could and because they knew it was unquestionably necessary. They simply know that they ought to.

He claimed that she used her expertise in the kitchen, which she was a master at, to help her community, which helped her begin her career. She was a fearless creator who gave everything a go and was able to make it not only tasty but also wholesome and thoughtful of the population she was feeding. It began with simply providing food for those in need.

Williams is merely making an effort to continue Lucille's good work. He did the same thing when it came to 2020. They used the resources they have and the skills they have mastered to benefit their community. That evolved into a lesson plan, and it has developed into everything that it is now.


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