LOGO

04 Feb 23 142 0 0

How Do We Prevent Wild Greater Yellowstone from Unraveling?

Cool Story - How Do We Prevent Wild Greater Yellowstone from Unraveling?

According to experts, the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem is at serious risk of losing its robust, top-notch wildlife populations if things continue as they are, with a rapidly growing human development footprint being cemented on private land, soaring outdoor recreation pressure on public land, and deepening negative effects from climate change.

The main offenders are the interruption of wildlife movement pathways and the degradation of safe habitats caused by an overabundance of human presence. In addition, climate change is changing the region's hydrology and creating favorable circumstances for invading species and exotic weeds to proliferate, which further threatens the ability of the land to support local animals and plants.

Mountain Journal has often noted the difficulties in its reporting. Readers have then inquired as to what proactive measures may be implemented right away to stop Greater Yellowstone from adopting the same trends that led to the extinction of species or population-level decreases elsewhere. Many of the simple things, such as placing total faith in the ability of the free market and the absence of regulations to produce enough wildlife protection, have either failed or shown to be catastrophically insufficient in the face of the repercussions of exponential expansion.

Here are a few ambitious, but not impossible, concepts that could be pursued.

Greater Yellowstone stands out as the birthplace of American wildlife conservation because of the wildlife, not because of the potential for outdoor pleasure or resource extraction. The loss of native species is unavoidable in the absence of a protection strategy.

The Lower 48 sole environment, Greater Yellowstone, still supports all of the native species that existed in 1491, including sizable populations of mammals, predators, and prey that may still travel freely across unbroken landscapes. The good news is that public concern for wildlife is pervasive and serves as a potent unifying force.

But there is no shared vision for the future that unites everyone in terms of goals and aspirations for America's most famous wildlife environment. A regional conservation strategy is urgently needed to maintain Greater Yellowstone's ecological health and stop it from following the Colorado Rockies, Wasatch Mountains of Utah, Sierra and other ranges in California, and the Florida Everglades.

A cohesive plan that places a high priority on safeguarding wildlife, the environment it requires, and crucial migration corridors that are found nowhere else at the same scale would be the superstructure of cross-boundary thinking in the twenty-first century. Such a strategy would prioritize wildlife protection and bring together elected leaders from towns and 20 counties who have power over the development patterns on 6 million acres of private land with federal and state land management organizations that manage 18 million acres of public land.

Representatives of the conservation, agriculture, economic, and recreational groups who support a game plan for the three-state region are also important advocates. Without a plan, it is unlikely that the current, disjointed, uncoordinated decision-making can preserve enough essential lands to maintain Greater Yellowstone's magnificent ecosystem.

Opportunities to enhance conservation are dwindling every day. Lack of funding is frequently cited by government representatives and environmentalists as a barrier to imaginative thinking. But what draws investment is vision.

A. Introduce a real estate transfer tax.

B. Implement a national "backpack tax" on all outdoor equipment 

C. Charge commercial bus tour operators and passengers at GYE airports a reasonable enplanement price

D. Increase impact costs for developers, especially for environmentally destructive projects

E. Permit the transfer of development rights and use them in more inventive ways

F. Permit local governments and residents to pass a sales tax

Make reduced agricultural tax rates and subsidies available only to farmers and ranchers in high-growth areas if they agree to protect their land.

The above article is selected by CoolDeeds.org. The information and the assets belong to their respective owners (original link).


Get inspired by these stories and start your own cool deeds. Let’s fill every neighborhood with good and cool activities. Start your first GroupUp activity or event, invite others, register participants & share your cool deeds so others can follow. Use CoolDeeds.com absolutely free tools to start your initiative. All for FREE, click here to start now.

Step 1: CREATE THE EVENT/ACTIVITY:

Get inspiration and pick a date and create an "Event / Group Up" at www.cooldeeds.com. It is absolutely FREE. There are so many ideas on www.CoolDeeds.com, let's take one and go with it or come up with your own ideas and start something good and cool in your neighborhood. Click here to get started.

Step 2: ANNOUNCE & INVITE:

Share it on Facebook, Twitter, and other social media accounts to announce. Send an invite to your friends, neighbors and family to join the "Event / Group Up".

Step 3: PERFORM EVENT & FEEL GOOD:

Perform the event, take images, videos, and share on www.CoolDeeds.com to inspire the world so others can do the same in their community and neighborhood.

You did it.......Even if you did this alone, you should be proud of yourself as we surely are. Let's start creating an "Event / Group Up" today. Please note CoolDeeds.com is absolutely FREE for all the above activities. Our only purpose is to spread good and cool activities everywhere.

Environment
Bringing more trees to Lancaster city and year-end letters of thanks

Ad Crable, an outdoors columnist, discussed the significance of Cody Kiefer, Lancaster City's first urban forester, in a column that appeared in the S...

0

52

0

Environment
Chilliwack mayor ‘disgusted’ with garbage on roadside; initiates cleanup

Thanks to several volunteers, a portion of Hope River Road in Chilliwack is much cleaner. On a chilly, rainy Saturday at noon, more than a dozen indi...

0

61

0

Environment
Affordable-housing hopes are building around 3D-printed homes

We require more homes in the United States to lower housing costs. Most estimates place the additional units at millions. There are many complicated ...

0

24

0

Environment
Iraqi sculptor uses artworks to encourage people to rebuild a life

Through his imaginative and moving pieces of art, an Iraqi sculptor hopes to encourage his nation to start over in their lives. Hadi Hamza, 68, a ret...

0

66

0

Environment
Come together to clean up the neighbor

Although the wind and rain have split communities, they are also drawing neighbors together. North Oak Park is littered with uprooted trees and stray ...

0

67

0

Environment
No need to beg for water anymore

Yasin Muhumad Faarah is a 70-year-old farmer, village elder, and community leader. He lives in a rural area near Jigjiga in the Somali region of Ethio...

0

92

0

Environment
New year, sow more seeds

Many Christians experience sentiments of anticipation as the new year begins in anticipation of fresh starts and chances to advance their religion. Fo...

0

74

0

Environment
Breakthrough & Historic "Climate Change Loss & Damage Fund" Created by World Leaders During UN COP27

During this year's COP27 session, the United Nations and its supporting members finally agreed on the "Climate Change Loss & Damage Fund" for the ...

0

118

0

Environment
Global African-Centered Clean-Up Project Focuses on Health and the Environment

Children at Roots Public Charter School in Northwest will take part in volunteer work for the first time since the pandemic. This weekend's meeting is...

0

122

0

Environment
World making little progress on food waste, a big climate problem

To lessen the amount of household garbage he sends to landfills, California resident Richard Redmond brings a gallon-sized container of food scraps to...

0

160

0

Environment
Non-profit World Help changing the world with a new distribution center in Virginia

World Help, a nonprofit, commemorates 31 years of giving back to local and global communities. The opening of a new distribution center is to date its...

0

148

0

Environment
Greenbuild International Conference + Expo Announces 2022 Keynote Lineup

  The U.S. Green Building Council  (USGBC) and Informa Connect, a division of Informa plc, recently announced&nb...

0

170

0