LOGO

29 Nov 22 87 0 0

In dry, unreliable weather, Indian farmers restore arid land

Cool Story - In dry, unreliable weather, Indian farmers restore arid land

Ramesh Hanumaiya probes his land with his hand for a few inches to inspect the soil. There is movement in the heavy, dark soil, and it is the result of little earthworms being roused from their abode.

Even though it may not seem like much, a handful of earthworm-filled dirt represents seven years of labor. Ramesh, 37, stated, "This earth used to be as hard as a brick." It now resembles a sponge. My crops can develop on schedule and in a healthy manner because the soil is rich in the nutrients and life they require.

Thousands of farmers in the Anantapur area of the Andhra Pradesh state in southern India have adopted what is referred to as regenerative agriculture practices, like Ramesh.

The process of once-fertile earth turning into dust has been successfully fought with strategies including employing natural fertilizers and planting crops alongside trees and other vegetation. As temperatures rise and rainfall patterns grow more erratic, climate change is accelerating the loss of agricultural land.

Over 40% of the world's land is thought to already be degraded, according to the UN agency that monitors desertification, which is one of the biggest threats to human society. According to U.N. estimates, desertification has an impact on roughly 1.5 billion people worldwide and 1.9 billion hectares of land, an area more than twice the size of the United States.

The area was always dry, but because we were able to predict when it would rain, people used to plan their farming activities appropriately, according to 69-year-old Malla Reddy, the head of a nonprofit that promotes organic farming methods in the area. Now since rainfall can occur at any time, farmers frequently lose their crops because they are unable to foresee it.

Additionally, as a result of higher temperatures, water evaporates more quickly, leaving less available to plants that need water.

Reddy's nonprofit assists individual farmers in restoring unproductive land throughout the entire district by working with over 60,000 farmers on 300,000 acres of land.

Roughly 70 million hectares, or about half of all the farmland in India, is dependent on rain for its agriculture, which is practiced by the majority of Indian farmers. According to experts, these lands are also the ones most vulnerable to poor agricultural practices including overusing chemical fertilizers, overfilling, and monocropping, which is the practice of growing only one crop every year.

Due to the widespread use of chemical fertilizers, pesticides, and weedicides, a large portion of the land is becoming unfit for cultivation by the other farmers in the vicinity.

Every week, a large number of vehicles equipped with speakers travel through our villages urging farmers to purchase various pesticides and weedkillers. Farmers are duped by their incredible marketing, claims E.B. Manohar, a 26-year-old organic farmer in the village of Khairevu.

Ajantha Reddy, a 28-year-old natural farmer in Anantapur, looks at his sweet lime fields. Before they see any return on their work and investment with sweet limes, farmers must wait many years. But Reddy is unconcerned.

He added, trimming his fruit orchards, "The trees have grown in 17 months as much as I would have anticipated them to grow in four years." During the COVID-19 pandemic, Reddy left his work as a software engineer in Bengaluru and went back to his village in Anantapur to start a farm.

Reddy has ample motivation to stick with natural farming methods for the foreseeable future since he enjoys watching his crops grow and his hometown prosper.

"I have no plans to return to Bangalore. During the pandemic, I returned home and asked myself, "Why should I work for someone else? I could provide a few individuals with a means of living because I have land to grow," he remarked. "That notion solidified my decision."

The above article is selected by CoolDeeds.org. The information and the assets belong to their respective owners (original link).


Get inspired by these stories and start your own cool deeds. Let’s fill every neighborhood with good and cool activities. Start your first GroupUp activity or event, invite others, register participants & share your cool deeds so others can follow. Use CoolDeeds.com absolutely free tools to start your initiative. All for FREE, click here to start now.

Step 1: CREATE THE EVENT/ACTIVITY:

Get inspiration and pick a date and create an "Event / Group Up" at www.cooldeeds.com. It is absolutely FREE. There are so many ideas on www.CoolDeeds.com, let's take one and go with it or come up with your own ideas and start something good and cool in your neighborhood. Click here to get started.

Step 2: ANNOUNCE & INVITE:

Share it on Facebook, Twitter, and other social media accounts to announce. Send an invite to your friends, neighbors and family to join the "Event / Group Up".

Step 3: PERFORM EVENT & FEEL GOOD:

Perform the event, take images, videos, and share on www.CoolDeeds.com to inspire the world so others can do the same in their community and neighborhood.

You did it.......Even if you did this alone, you should be proud of yourself as we surely are. Let's start creating an "Event / Group Up" today. Please note CoolDeeds.com is absolutely FREE for all the above activities. Our only purpose is to spread good and cool activities everywhere.

Honest Reviews
Japanese fans go viral for cleaning up everyone's mess at the World Cup

For staying around to clean up after the opening match between Qatar and Ecuador at the 2022 FIFA World Cup on Monday, Japanese football fans have gon...

0

59

0

Honest Reviews
Friendship AME Church proves good deeds can be done despite distance

Although Friendship AME Church is in Mount Pleasant, they believe that doing good deeds doesn't depend on where you are. The Servant Pastor for Frien...

0

101

0

Honest Reviews
Russell Crowe donated to the bookshop

A tiny bookstore called Bookbags and Dragon Tales opened in Norwich, England, a few months before the pandemic, in 2019. Before deciding they needed a...

0

86

0

Honest Reviews
Sam Tucker restores cars then gives them away to people down on their luck

One automobile at a time, a Sunshine Coast resident is significantly improving the lives of others through a project that began as a simple can collec...

0

109

0

Honest Reviews
Random acts of kindness in honor of Claremore man spark hundreds of dollars in coffee donations

At a nearby Dutch Bros, a random act of kindness in memory of a Claremore man sparked hundreds of dollars. As Todd Brown's 52nd birthday neared, Kare...

0

64

0

Honest Reviews
Carrboro nonprofit ReCYCLEry aims to make bicycling more inclusive, accessible

A charity bike shop in Carrboro named The ReCYCLEry is working to provide cycling accessibility for all residents. The communities in North Carolina ...

0

93

0

Honest Reviews
Hobby Lobby giving away his company because 'wealth is a curse’

David Green, the founder of Hobby Lobby, declared in a Fox News op-ed published on October 21 that he is giving up his business and that he "chose God...

0

200

0

Honest Reviews
Jewellery store owner gifts cars, bikes to staff as a Diwali bonus

This year's stunning Diwali bonus was given to staff members by the proprietor of a jewellery store in Tamul Nadu. Most employees are anticipating the...

0

119

0

Honest Reviews
An 11-year-old boy presents flowers to King Soopers staff following the mass shooting

Jody Witmer had to tell her 11-year-old son, JJ, that a shooter had killed 10 people, three of whom were employees, the day after the mass shooting at...

0

87

0

Honest Reviews
Nonprofit hopes Small loans and job training will ease the hardships of leaving prison

Found a fantastic post in LUFKIN. On a recent Thursday morning, Maurice Watts arrived at a small, red-brick structure while wearing black athletic we...

0

86

0

Honest Reviews
This week’s Positive News roundup

Parisians were promised a swim in the Seine Image cedits: Bastien Parisians are getting ready to swim in the Seine once more, a century after it w...

0

107

0

Honest Reviews
Giving Tuesday: Americans do 8 good deeds a month

Americans are looking forward to spreading the holiday cheer and giving back to their communities after yet another year of battling with the COVID-19...

0

144

0